TestToTester

What do you do when you find a bug?

What do you do when you find a bug?

Hold on do not answer it right now. Let me first set the context.

You are part of an agile team. The developers sit opposite to you. You are testing a feature in a session. You are time bound and have the good habit of capturing notes when you test. When you now find a bug what do you do? Assuming that you have taken enough notes you go on to write a good bug description and may capture a screen shot, video of the bug and continue with your session. At the end of the session do you

Open the defect tracking tool (wait for it to load), enter all the fields for a bug, upload necessary evidence and have the tool share the defects with your dev team?

Or

Open the defect tracking tool (wait for it to load), enter all fields for a bug, upload necessary evidence and then compose an email to the dev team with the bug id’s/descriptions?

Or

Walk to the developer share your notes; reproduce it if required, work together to identify the problem?

I work in an agile team; we collaborate together with the dev team to deliver our stories and in turn the product. When we find a bug we walk up to the developer, share our test notes and bugs with them. If the developer have more questions we work together for may be 30 min to try identify the root cause together. We then attach the session sheet to the task in mingle (project tracking tool) and update our coverage sheet. If we identify a bug as “out of sprint” we log it in mingle.

I have seen that this process is much quicker. It takes approx 1 min to ask if the developer is free for an update and the next 10 min to update the session notes and bugs.

Apart from a quick feedback, this process has also helped in bridging good communication between testers and dev team. Dev team are amazed by the scenarios, test notes captured during testing and this has lead to admiration of the test team. Testers understand and learn more about the system every time they pair up with the dev team to discuss test notes.

This process has made me wonder if it’s time we need newer, lighter, interactive defect tracking tools? Or do we need it all? I might write a series about this.

But, for now it would really help me if you answer -> what do you do when you find a bug?

Puzzle - Help the captain

In the year 2050 Captain Morgan and his crew are stuck midway development/testing for the next huge OSv5.1 release for their spaceship Jatayu.

The problem they are stuck at is:

To verify correctness of the results returned from a black box calculator
Procedure the crew follows:

1. Answer close to 40 questions [Please note: The questionnaire can have drop down menus, radio buttons, and relationships within questions (some questions will be displayed if a specific question is answered)]
The captain of the ship has signed an NDA and cannot share the questions
2. The answers are fed into a Black Box (Calculator)
3. The results are displayed on the screen

Assistance offered:
Black illusionists have agreed to verify if the values fed into their Black Box are correct or not. But they will check only 25 combinations (we supply inputs to each question and the actual results). They will annihilate us if we exceed the magic figure of 25.

Strategies suggested by Problem Squealers in the crew team:

1. Pick 25 random values returned by answering the questions to the Black illusionists and verify the results.
2. Discuss with the merchants and prioritize the most common 25 scenarios with realistic answers to the questions, and then have them verified by the Black illusionists.
3. Invest time to mechanize all possible combinations. Run the automation suite. Choose 25 weird values and get them verified by the Black illusionists.
4. Broadcast the risks to the Kingdom and follow idea 2.

Captain Morgan, though happy, is not assured with ideas from his crew. He now invites citizens of Planet Earth for help.

Can you help Captain Morgan?

Next Event - Speaking @ TMF

Hi All,

Francis Balfe and I will be at the UK Test Management Forum to talk about recent challenges, test strategy and methods which worked for us in our recent project.

We hope to get loads of feedback from the audience :)

I also look forward to a lot of other great sessions lined up at the forum especially the talk from Mark Crowther. So, if you are a tester in UK and have no plans for the holidays walk into TMF.

Cheers

WeekNight Testing Goes LIVE

Hi All,

Announcement:

We are launching WeekNight testing, a chapter of Weekned Testing LIVE in Central London on Mar 23rd and Markus Gartner is launching it in Germany at the same time. We will also have our regular Weeknight Session over Skype. An exciting day to meet and test with loads of testers around the globe. Don’t miss out on the opportunity. For more details check the link http://skillsmatter.com/podcast/agile-testing/weeknight-testing-live

To register thru Skype ping SKYPEID: weeknighttesting

See ya All on 23rd MARCH

UPDATE: For all testers who missed the fun, there is a video capture of the event available @ http://skillsmatter.com/podcast/agile-testing/weeknight-testing-live/

Confessions of a blogger – Episode 1


 

I guess we all try and want to be better in whatever we do and one such aspiration led me stay away from my blog for a long time now. I wanted my blog articles to be written in better English, talk about stuff very new or something that no one else (well, at least the people I know) had even thought of, better than the previous ones, longer, attract more readers and more comments, etc. The result: It has been more than 6 months and not even a single article in it. The pressure I put on myself to make my next article better than my previous ones have only made me feel awful about myself. The last 6 months have been one of the most exciting times in my life and career but I have missed to write about any one of them.

 
 

Anyways as the proverb goes "It's no use crying over spilt milk" – let me try summarizing the last 6 months in a series of posts or may be just one. I guess there are times a blogger has to realize the reasons why he/she started the blog and I guess I have.

 
 

Episode 1: Moved from Bangalore to London: I was happy, relaxed, having fun with my friends, wife, family and my favourite testers in Bangalore. As they say good thing do not last long – something popped into my mind and I kind of felt my life is getting redundant.  I wanted a change not just in terms of the job or company I worked in but also the environment I lived in. Hoping for a change is one thing but to embrace a change is a daunting task. I realized this as I started planning step by step. Which country do I move to? Which visa can I get quickly? Who have active test communities? Where are my skills required? How long will I be without a job? What can I do when I am not in a job? How much money do I need? Where will I stay? Should I sell all my stuff? How long do I have to be away from my wife, friends and parents? And most importantly is it worth all this effort? To make things more complicated I got two exciting job offers – one I would call a dream offer and the other an offer I could not refuse. It was something I was looking for a long time. I knew who my boss would be and I respected Caroline Shekar a lot for her thoughts about testing and testers. She is one of those rare Indian testers in the top hierarchy of a reputed firm who not only is interested to see a better testing community but is actually putting efforts to help testers realize their potential, priorities, challenges ahead and also educate the big bosses around on the realistic expectations from a testing team. I would have really loved to work with her. Unfortunately things around me were changing rapidly, my wife now had an assignment in the US and this added more confusion to where I am heading. By this time I had work visa from 2 countries. With a heavy heart I turned down the offer and started focusing on the country. I chose UK over US because at that moment I felt UK was right for me. Also I came across a lot of gathering events for testers, conferences, workshops in London area which made me stick to UK. This choice in country meant I had long talks with my wife (very long), friends, mentors, gurus and family to convince them and myself for the reasons behind my decision. Just when I thought I am thru with the hard task the dream offer came in. My mentor had plans of starting one of a kind exploratory testing service company in Bangalore and wanted to know if I am interested to be part of the team. Why would any sane tester let go of such an offer? I the insane tester did. I guess it's the most difficult decision I have taken after proposing to my girlfriend now my wife about 11 years back. Being the great mentor he has always been, Pradeep respected my decision and wished me all the luck in the new country. Finally, I landed in the UK last week of Oct last year. 

 
 

Did this episode teach me anything?

Move out of your comfort zone and you will be surprised what you could learn - the days leading to my day of departure from India to London were some of the most intense days I have ever been thru. The pressure of leaving behind and heading to an unknown country with a lot of uncertainty does take a toll on the mind and body.  

 
 

This only meant that I need to keep my emotions controlled and run thru loads of checklists and tasks. I had to get stuff sorted in banks, insurance firms, government offices, talk to different customer care departments, potential buyers, run thru medical check-ups, etc and had to sync up with my personal tasks of visiting friends, family, shopping, commuting, etc. There were many times when I had to change priorities on the run and make quick decisions. To summarize I guess this little period taught me a lot in planning, executing, negotiating, decision making, handling stress, multi-tasking, communicating and manage in one of the most emotionally stressful phase of my life till now. I still recollect the hundreds of threads that ran in my head parallel when I was having a nice dinner or spending time with my friends. I think I was able to lighten up only when I rested my back on seat of the plane to London.


 

End of Episode - 1

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